Canon 18-135 Vs 55-250: Deciphering the Ideal Lens for You

canon 18-135 vs 55-250

Looking for the ultimate lens for your Canon camera? Look no further! In this article, we’ll compare the Canon 18-135 lens to the 55-250 lens, giving you all the information you need to make the right choice.

We’ll explore their features and performance, without mentioning specific products or brands. Find out which lens is compatible with your camera, discover their image stabilization capabilities, and learn about their aperture ranges.

We’ll even dive into the limitations of clip-in filters. With recommendations tailored to your needs, this article is a must-read for photography enthusiasts and professionals alike.

Get ready to unlock the full potential of your Canon camera with the perfect lens!

Key Takeaways

  • Both lenses have image stabilization technology, reducing camera shake and producing sharper images.
  • The Canon 18-135mm lens has a wider aperture of f/3.5, providing better low-light performance and depth of field control.
  • The Canon 55-250mm lens offers better image quality, especially for wildlife photography, with slightly less sharpness but lower aberration compared to the 18-135mm lens.
  • The 18-135mm lens is praised for its versatility and all-purpose use, while the 55-250mm lens is highly recommended for wildlife photography due to its extra reach and better image quality.

Table of Contents

Compatibility With Cameras

When choosing between the Canon 18-135 and 55-250 lenses, it’s essential to consider their compatibility with your camera. Both lenses have the Canon EF-S lens mount, making them compatible with a range of Canon cameras, including the Canon T8i, Canon 90D, and Canon SL3. This compatibility ensures that the lenses will fit perfectly onto your camera body without any issues.

It’s crucial to check if your camera supports EF-S lenses before making a decision. EF-S lenses are specifically designed for Canon APS-C cameras, providing excellent image quality and performance.

canon 18-135 vs 55-250

Image Stabilization Capabilities

To enhance your photography experience, consider the image stabilization capabilities of the Canon 18-135 and 55-250 lenses. Both lenses feature image stabilization technology that helps reduce camera shake and produce sharper images, especially in low light or when shooting at longer focal lengths. The Canon 18-135mm lens is equipped with a 4-stop image stabilizer, providing efficient stabilization for both stills and video shooting. On the other hand, the 55-250mm lens comes with a 3.5-stop image stabilizer, which is slightly less powerful but still effective in reducing blur.

Here is a table comparing the image stabilization capabilities of the two lenses:

Lens ModelImage Stabilization Capability
Canon 18-135mm4-stop image stabilizer
Canon 55-250mm3.5-stop image stabilizer

Both lenses offer significant benefits in terms of image stabilization, allowing you to capture sharp and clear images in various shooting scenarios. Whether you need a versatile lens for everyday use or a reliable telephoto option for capturing distant subjects, both the Canon 18-135mm and 55-250mm lenses provide excellent image stabilization capabilities to enhance your photography results.

Please note that while image stabilization helps reduce camera shake, it does not eliminate the need for proper technique and stabilization techniques such as using a tripod or correct handholding techniques.

Aperture Range Comparison

To further compare the Canon 18-135mm and 55-250mm lenses, let’s delve into their aperture ranges. The aperture range of a lens determines the amount of light that enters the camera, as well as the depth of field and low-light performance.

Here’s a breakdown of the aperture ranges for the Canon 18-135mm and 55-250mm lenses:

  • Canon 18-135mm lens:

  • Aperture range: f/3.5 – f/5.6

  • Wider maximum aperture of f/3.5 allows for better low-light performance and depth of field control.

  • Narrower minimum aperture of f/5.6 may limit the ability to capture well-exposed images in certain lighting conditions.

  • Canon 55-250mm lens:

  • Aperture range: f/4.0 – f/5.6

  • Slightly narrower maximum aperture of f/4.0 compared to the 18-135mm lens.

  • Similar minimum aperture of f/5.6 as the 18-135mm lens.

When comparing the aperture ranges, it’s evident that the Canon 18-135mm lens offers a wider maximum aperture, providing better low-light performance and more control over depth of field. However, both lenses have a similar minimum aperture, which may limit their ability to capture well-exposed images in certain lighting conditions.

Limitations of Clip-In Filters

Let’s now explore the limitations of using clip-in filters with the Canon 18-135mm and 55-250mm lenses.

A major limitation lies in their compatibility. These filters are only compatible with EF lenses, not EF-S lenses like the 18-135mm and 55-250mm lenses. This significantly limits the options for certain lens types, making it difficult to achieve specific photographic effects.

Another limitation is the potential for aberration. While the 55-250mm lens is recommended over the 18-135mm lens due to its lower aberration, clip-in filters can still introduce additional aberrations that may impact image quality.

It’s important to consider these limitations when using clip-in filters, and to explore alternative filter options that are better suited for the Canon 18-135mm and 55-250mm lenses.

Aberration Comparison

Compare the aberration performance of the Canon 18-135 and 55-250 lenses to determine their differences. When it comes to aberration comparison, there are key factors to consider:

  • Canon EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM lens: This lens exhibits softness at 85mm and chromatic aberration in the corners. It has a wider aperture at the minimum focal length, which may affect aberration performance.

  • Canon EF-S 55-250mm F/4-5.6 IS STM lens: This lens shows slightly less sharpness across the whole range but has lower aberration compared to the 18-135mm lens. It’s also lighter, potentially impacting aberration performance and overall handling.

  • Recommendation: Users highly recommend the 55-250mm IS lens for its aberration performance and value for money, especially for wildlife photography.

Tips for Astrophotography and Portraits

Consider the focal length and maximum aperture of your lens when shooting portraits or engaging in astrophotography.

For portraits, a lens with a focal length between 50mm and 85mm is commonly used to achieve a natural perspective and flattering results. The Canon EF 50mm f/1.8, also known as the Nifty Fifty, is a popular choice due to its wide maximum aperture of f/1.8, allowing for excellent low-light performance and shallow depth of field.

When it comes to astrophotography, a wide aperture lens is crucial for capturing the faint light of celestial objects. The Canon EF-S 10-18mm f/4.5-5.6 IS STM or the Canon EF-S 24mm f/2.8 STM are both excellent options.

It’s important to consider the performance of the lens on your specific camera body, as not all lenses perform the same on every camera model.

User Reviews and Opinions

Based on user feedback and experiences, the performance and features of the Canon 18-135 and 55-250 lenses have been widely discussed and compared. Here are some key observations and opinions from users:

  • Many users appreciate the versatility of the Canon 18-135 lens, stating that it’s a great all-purpose lens for travel and everyday use.

  • The Canon 55-250 lens receives praise for its image quality, particularly for wildlife photography. Users find it to be a reliable telephoto lens with good sharpness and detail.

  • Some users recommend upgrading to a mirrorless camera for a smaller and lighter setup, as both lenses are compatible with mirrorless systems using an adapter.

  • Users highlight the advantages of the 18-135 lens for video purposes, especially when paired with Canon bodies that have Dual-Pixel AF.

  • Some users suggest considering the performance of the lenses on different camera sensors, as this can impact image quality and overall experience.

General Information About the Lenses

To understand the Canon 18-135 and 55-250 lenses better, it’s important to delve into their specifications and features.

Both lenses have the Canon EF-S lens mount, making them compatible with cameras like Canon T8i, Canon 90D, and Canon SL3.

The Canon 18-135mm lens replaces the 18-55mm lens and features a wider aperture of f/3.5 compared to f/4.0 for the 55-250mm lens.

Lab tests indicate slightly less sharpness across the whole range for the 55-250mm lens and softness at 85mm, while the 18-135mm lens shows chromatic aberration in the corners.

The 55-250mm lens offers extra reach, making it ideal for wildlife or distant subjects, while the 18-135mm lens is handy for occasional shooting of interiors due to its speed.

User experiences and recommendations lean towards the 18-135mm lens for travel purposes and as a walk-around lens, while the 55-250mm lens receives praise for image quality, particularly for wildlife photography.

canon 18-135 vs 55-250

Optics and Lens Quality

Now let’s delve into the optics and lens quality of the Canon 18-135 and 55-250 lenses.

  • Sharpness: Lab tests indicate that the 55-250mm lens shows slightly less sharpness across the range, with some softness at 85mm. On the other hand, the 18-135mm lens exhibits chromatic aberration in the corners and slightly less sharpness overall.

  • Aperture: The 18-135mm lens has a wider aperture of f/3.5 compared to f/4.0 for the 55-250mm lens. This wider aperture provides potential advantages for low-light photography and achieving a shallower depth of field.

  • Filter Compatibility: The 18-135mm lens has a larger diameter of 67mm, which may affect filter compatibility. Meanwhile, the 55-250mm lens has a 58mm diameter, allowing for a wider range of filter options.

In summary, while the 55-250mm lens may have slightly lower sharpness and limitations in certain focal lengths, it offers better image quality and is highly recommended for wildlife photography.

On the other hand, the 18-135mm lens is suitable for travel and general walk-around purposes, offering a wider aperture and compatibility with different filters.

Focus Performance and Accuracy

You can gauge the focus performance and accuracy of the Canon 18-135 and 55-250 lenses by evaluating their autofocus capabilities.

Lab tests have shown that the 55-250mm lens exhibits slightly less sharpness across the entire range and softness at 85mm, which suggests potential differences in focus accuracy and performance between the two lenses.

Additionally, the 55-250mm lens offers extra reach, making it advantageous for wildlife photography. This indicates that it may have different focus capabilities for capturing distant subjects.

User experiences and recommendations also suggest variations in focus performance based on shooting preferences. The 18-135mm lens is praised as a suitable travel and walk-around lens, while the 55-250mm lens is favored for its image quality, particularly for wildlife photography.

It’s also worth noting that the 18-135mm lens is recommended for video purposes with Canon bodies that have Dual-Pixel AF, suggesting potential differences in focus accuracy and performance for video shooting between the two lenses.

Conclusion

In conclusion, after comparing the Canon 18-135 lens to the 55-250 lens, it’s clear that both lenses have their strengths and weaknesses.

The 18-135 lens offers a wider range of compatibility with different cameras and has better image stabilization capabilities.

However, the 55-250 lens has a longer focal length range and a narrower aperture, making it more suitable for capturing distant subjects.

Ultimately, the choice between these lenses will depend on your specific needs and preferences as a photographer.

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